About

Myers has always used flea market finds for inspiration, layering them into meticulously ordered, textural abstractions. When Myers was growing up in Adelaide, Australia, he loved going to the local dump, where he would collect discarded objects from other people’s trash.  “My father still talks about how I used to bring home beat-up, broken radios, take them apart, and then try to build them back together in new ways, in different configurations that were more interesting to me,” Myers recalls. Now a Brooklyn-based artist, Myers still scours thrift shops, flea markets and sidewalk rubbish for new material to reorder into multi-media works, compositions that are as conceptually intriguing as they are beautiful.

Systematic repetition and grid-like arrangements of found materials are prominent themes in Myers’s work. His exhibitions include fantastical allusions to the imagined life of the people and places portrayed in this vintage ephemera —old postcards, trading cards and lithographs, to name a few — which he then layers with unusual media along the lines of Wite-Out, tape, and color swatches. These unexpected combinations are then painstakingly arranged and presented in large and small-format grids. Myers even places some of his work inside immaculate plexiglass display cases, elegantly encasing the art within, causing the colors to seem more extravagant, the presentation more gleaming.

Timothy Paul Myers has recently been the focus of articles and interviews in the New York Times, LA Times, Interior Design and WWD Magazine, and his work is widely shown in galleries and museums in America and internationally, including the permanent collections of Richard Meiers’ One Grand Army Plaza and the entrepreneur Tory Burch.